It’s no secret that GLOCK pistols are the top choice of American Law Enforcement. In fact, they are used by over two-thirds of all LE agencies in the United States. The U.S. is also GLOCK’s largest market worldwide. That means that there are a lot of GLOCK pistols out there and, despite their reputation for durability and reliability, they are not indestructible, especially with poor user maintenance.

GLOCK does provide a limited lifetime warranty on their pistols, and only the parts that eventually wear out from use are excluded, such as magazines. They do ask, however, that every pistol undergo a routine and simple inspection once per year, which is basically a function test shooters should be doing on their own every time they disassemble their pistols.

The Solution

To this end, GLOCK offers a straightforward, one-day certified armorer’s course to demonstrate how the pistol can be completely disassembled with just a simple punch and how to identify damaged or incorrectly installed parts and replace them as needed. GLOCK also offers an LE-only version of this course and has teamed up with the National Rifle Association’s Law Enforcement Division to provide the class for free to police officers at NRA Headquarters in Fairfax, Virginia.

A course taught at the NRA in June by GLOCK Firearms Instructor Jim Greene, who is also a captain with the Mecklenburg County Sheriff’s Office Reserves in Charlotte, North Carolina, hosted over 30 law enforcement officers from across the East coast. Greene led the students in the disassembly, repair, reassembly, function and inspection of the GLOCK pistol. As he explained, it is the GLOCK’s basic design, use of fewer parts, and parts interchangeability without necessary gunsmithing that make the armorer course possible in only one day.

Ready to Serve

GLOCK’s continued partnership with law enforcement and the NRA makes free courses like this possible. For more about GLOCK training and available courses, visit www.glockprofessional.com. To learn more about the NRA’s Law Enforcement Division and their many programs, visit www.nrahq.org/law.

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