Phrases like “tank tough” and “strong as a Mac truck” have become something on the order of clichés when describing many tactical folders. Face it, all folders start with the handicap of needing to be turned around a relatively small pivot pin, so none can ever really be said to be as tough as a fixed blade of equal blade thickness. Still, every once in a while I run into a folder that truly does seem to fit the description of “nearly indestructible.” The Calavera frame-lock “El Patron” I’ve been carrying for the last few months, custom made by Jeremy Robertson, has certainly earned that honor.

After college, Jeremy worked as a commercial airline pilot, making knives as a hobby in his spare time. He soon found that he enjoyed his pastime more than he did flying a plane eight hours a day. Taking the bull by the horns, he quit his day job and became a full-time custom knifemaker, offering under the company name Calavera Cutlery everything from railroad spike blades to frontier tomahawks. His goal was to offer a totally ergonomic knife. “I am blessed with average hands, so if it feels good to me, it feels good to most people. I set out to make a hard-use titanium-framed folder that you could use comfortably, with no harsh corners or hot spots especially at the index finger and at the heel of the palm. The El Patron was the result.”

Steel Specs

Jeremy’s El Patron starts with two slabs of massive 0.15-inch-thick titanium for a handle frame. For the blade, customers have the choice of 0.18-inch-thick convex-ground D2 steel or CPM 3V Rockwell 60 in lengths of 3.25 and 3.75 inches. Each blade turns on phosphor bronze washers. A titanium pocket clip allows for tip-up right-hand carry. Both thumb stud and spine mounted “flipper” openers are available for one-hand use. Prices run from $425 to $525 depending on the options selected. Milled side plates and Micarta inlays for the handle scales are also available at extra cost.

For more information visit calaveracutlery.com

For the complete article please refer to Tactical Knives July 2013.

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