Not everyone can drive a Formula 1 racecar. It requires years of training, practice and incredible skill to drive the world’s premier sports cars properly in competition. Built from the ground up for unbelievable levels of performance, the F1 racecar is a precision machine. So is the Tanfoglio Stock III, but the difference between a Stock III and an F1 car is that anyone can own and shoot a Stock III. In fact, the Stock III will likely offer improvements in the average person’s shooting performance, whereas the average person would have difficulty even getting an F1 racecar to move.

European American Arms (EAA) Corporation in Florida is the U.S. importer of Tanfoglio pistols; Tanfoglio is known in the international shooting community as a premiere maker of pistols for competition and sport shooting. The company’s International Practical Shooting Confederation (IPSC) friendly lineup includes guns for every division, with the Stock III built to be ready out of the box for IPSC’s Production division. Unlike Production Division in the U.S. Practical Shooting Association (USPSA), IPSC Production has very strict rules about modifying the gun and an interesting rule about the trigger pull weight. In IPSC Production, the first shot on any Production-legal gun must have a pull weight over 5 pounds, but there are no restrictions on the pull weight for subsequent shots. As a result of this rule, the dominant guns in IPSC Production are traditional double-action/single-action (DA/SA) pistols with a 5- to 6-pound DA first shot and 2-pound triggers for every shot after that. Contrast this with the U.S., where the dominant Production guns are striker-fired polymer pistols with 3.5-pound triggers for every shot. The IPSC Production rules put striker-fired pistols at a technological disadvantage…

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Show Comments
  • Derori

    Very first semiauto handgun I ever owned was a Tanfoglio TZ75–a very nice firearm! Personally, I really liked those early ones with the longer slide release and slide-mounted decocker and safety. But the lever was hard to move. If they had made one like the G series Beretta that would automatically spring back up, I might be tempted to think it was the best pistol out there.

  • H.T.V. Blu

    I think people perceive CZ as fairly humdrum or even low quality. I’ve heard people moan about occasional tooling marks or lack of pristine finishing INSIDE the pistols. One particular member of a forum to which I belong is permanently comparing disfavorably to his Sigs, happily ignoring the vast price difference. Yet, I genuinely cannot see what he gets for the extra cash (beyond his choice of course!) If you want an high quality internal finish buy a CZ custom shop pistol. About the same price as Sig Sauers and beautifully finished.

    So why is this relevant to a Tanfoglio review?

    Due to the above noted misconception of CZs, I believe any clone (of a CZ) is met with some derision by those who do not know better. I fear this is true from Canik to Sphinx. Yet, they are missing out on some of the best pistols out there.

    I think the CZ 75 was and is a great design and the updated contemporary versions – the P-01 and SP-01 are as good, if not better than any of their competition.

    Tanfoglio enhance this great design with a slightly more luxurious feel and minor design changes. All this and, for the most part, cheaper than a Glock. What’s not to like?

  • H.T.V. Blu

    I think people perceive CZ as fairly humdrum or even low quality. I’ve heard people moan about occasional tooling marks or lack of pristine finishing INSIDE the pistols. One particular member of a forum to which I belong is permanently comparing disfavorably to his Sigs, happily ignoring the vast price difference. Yet, I genuinely cannot see what he gets for the extra cash (beyond his choice of course!) If you want an high quality internal finish buy a CZ custom shop pistol. About the same price as Sig Sauers and beautifully finished.

    So why is this relevant to a Tanfoglio review?

    Due to the above noted misconception of CZs, I believe any clone (of a CZ) is met with some derision by those who do not know better. I fear this is true from Canik to Sphinx. Yet, they are missing out on some of the best pistols out there.

    I think the CZ 75 was and is a great design and the updated contemporary versions – the P-01 and SP-01 are as good, if not better than any of their competition.

    Tanfoglio enhance this great design with a slightly more luxurious feel and minor design changes. All this and, for the most part, cheaper than a Glock. What’s not to like?