Product Spotlight: The Ti-Rant .45 Suppressor by AAC

The Ti-RANT is made to withstand heavy use yet still be lightweight.

AAC's Ti-Rant .45|Photo by Richard King

AAC’s Ti-RANT .45 is the company’s most advanced and most effective pistol suppressor.

Meet the Ti-Rant

The Ti-RANT is made to withstand heavy use yet still be lightweight. It is constructed using Grade 9 titanium for the housing, 17-4PH stainless steel for the blast baffle and piston assembly and hardcoat anodized 7075-T6 aluminum for the secondary baffles. The Ti-RANT uses eight tightly fitted, snap-together , AAC-designed “K” baffles contained in a 1.38-inch-diameter concentric tube. The unit is 8.74 inches long and weighs 11.5 ounces. When used on the AAC 1911 pistol, the system is 17.25 inches long and weighs 3.3 pounds.

ASAP Boost

The Ti-RANT uses Advanced Armament’s ASAP booster system to allow semi-automatic operation from handguns that do not have fixed barrels. Booster systems overcome the added weight and leverage applied to the barrel by the suppressor that would otherwise reduce slide velocity and cause stoppages. The ASAP is comprised of three stainless steel parts: a spring, piston and end cap with a perforated chamber. It uses the escaping gas to briefly remove the weight of the suppressor from the barrel. The gas enters a chamber where it pushes the baffle stack and housing forward. The forward motion removes the mass of the suppressor from the barrel just long enough for the
slide to unlock from the barrel, and the unlocking is assisted by the rearward movement of the piston.

Point of Impact

Suppressors often change the POI— added weight changes the recoil impulse and barrel harmonics. The ASAP design partially solves the problem by allowing the can to be rotated to minimize shift in POI after it is attached. To move the POI, grasp the unloaded pistol and pull the Ti-RANT forward and rotate it to any of 10 positions that correspond to the sprockets on the ASAP piston. The Ti-RANT is designed to eliminate muzzle flash. Hotter loads that run close to supersonic speed, however, may create some muzzle flash.

 

This article was originally published in the November 2014 issue of COMBAT HANDGUNS. Subscription is available in print and digital editions below.

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