The following is a press release from Ruger

Sturm, Ruger & Company, Inc. (NYSE: RGR) introduces the Ruger LCR in .327 Federal Magnum, the newest variation of the revolutionary Lightweight Compact Revolver (LCR). Chambered in .327 Federal Magnum, this six-round LCR has an additional round of capacity compared to other centerfire LCRs. This double-action only revolver also features a concealed hammer to minimize snagging during concealed carry.

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“The LCR in .327 Federal Magnum combines the proven design of the LCR with the performance of the .327 Federal Magnum cartridge to create a great revolver for both concealed carry and home defense,” said Chris Killoy, Ruger President and COO.

This new LCR maintains all the features of the critically acclaimed original LCR. Its double-action trigger pull is uniquely engineered with a patented friction reducing cam fire control system. The trigger pull force on the LCR builds gradually and peaks later in the trigger stroke, resulting in a smooth, non-stacking trigger pull that feels much lighter than it actually is. The LCR in .327 Federal Magnum utilizes a compact Hogue® Tamer™ grip with finger grooves, which is highly effective at reducing felt recoil. The LCR in .327 Federal Magnum has three main components: a polymer fire control housing, a blackened 400 series stainless steel monolithic frame and an extensively fluted stainless steel cylinder.

When originally introduced, the Ruger LCR revolver was one of the most significant new revolver designs in over a century and it has since been awarded three patents. In addition to the .new 327 Federal Magnum caliber, the LCR also is available in .38 Special +P, .357 Magnum, 9 mm Luger, .22 Magnum and .22 Long Rifle. Other variations of the LCR include Crimson Trace® Lasergrips® models and .38 Special +P, external hammer LCRx™ models with a 1.875” or 3” barrel. All LCR models feature a replaceable white ramp front sight and an integral U-notch rear sight.

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For more information on the Ruger LCR in .327 Federal Magnum or to learn more about the extensive line of award-winning Ruger firearms, visit http://www.Ruger.com or http://www.Facebook.com/Ruger. To find accessories for the LCR or other Ruger firearms, visit http://ShopRuger.com or your local independent retailer of Ruger firearms.

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  • Annpu Vicerpu

    The Ruger LCR series are not exciting firearms. They are not shiny, they are not pretty, the first reaction to them is not “hey, cool!” What they are however, are reliable, lightweight revolvers, intended for those wanting something in a small light package, but with maximum BANG.

    As with any short-barrel firearm, unless you practice regularly, do not expect to be hitting bullseyes at 25 yards. This is for all intents and purposes, a self-defense firearm, and that means about 5 to 7 yards, tops. At that range, a reasonably good shooter should be able to hit vital areas within 2 to 3 shots.

    The LCR series is an important contribution to modern self-defense arms because the form factor remains the same no matter what caliber you choose, from the .22 LR through the 9mm, all holsters and accessories are interchangeable. It is not unreasonable to select a .22 LR or .22 WMR version to start a shooter on, then move up to a higher caliber for self-defense. Except for recoil, all the training elements will transfer.

    Each of the LCR series has benefits. As noted, the .22 LR version makes a great training gun, due to inexpensive ammo and minimal recoil. The .22 WMR with the appropriate ammo such as Gold Dot might be considered passable for self-defense if someone simply could not handle racking a semi-auto or the recoil of higher calibers. The .357 version brings big fire-power while being able to train with lesser .38 loads. In 9mm one has a back-up gun that would use the same ammo as the primary 9mm piece.

    This recent addition to the LCR series in .327 Federal Magnum is my favorite of the bunch. Many people simply do not understand the .327 Federal Magnum round, comparing it to the simple .32 S&W Long. Trust me – they are NOT the same.

    If you review ballistics comparisons on the Federal (ammo) website, you’ll see that the .327 Federal Magnum compares quite favorably with .357 ammo, and with much less felt recoil. This firearm also provides the shooter a variety of loads to select from, as it will handle .32 S&W Long, .32 S&W Short, .32 H&R Magnum, .32 ACP, as well as the .327 Federal Magnum.

    While many say the .32 / .327 ammo is hard to find, all one has to do is check the internet. Many suppliers carry some variation of ammo for this gun, and as it’s not likely to be a range gun, you really don’t need that much. Enough .32 Long to practice with, and a box of .327 Federal Magnum in hollow point for carry purposes. Add a couple of HKS-32 speedloaders and you’re ready for the world with a hard-hitting, reliable self-defense weapon.

    The trigger is the only aspect of this firearm that may make it less practical for people with limited hand strength. As with most double-action only revolvers, the trigger is a bit long and heavy, coming in at about 10 pounds. For the average shooter, this shouldn’t be a problem. In fact, I find this to be a very easy firearm to stage the trigger, activating it about half-way, finalize my aim, then finish the pull. But I do have a friend, a single mom with two kids, who may weigh 110 pounds soaking wet, and she had to use the index fingers of both hands to fire the LCR. Likely she is the rare shooter, but be aware if one is considering the LCR (or any firearm) be sure you actually get the chance to test one before you plunk down your dollars.

    The LCR series is not super expensive, but they aren’t cheap either. Current prices are in the $400 to $500 range.

    Ruger has a vague warranty policy, though internet bloggers claim it’s a simple “if it breaks we will fix it” process.

    It has been said often, and wisely, that for every day carry, one should arm themselves with the largest caliber you can fire accurately and consistently. Make no mistake, the six-shot Ruger LCR in .327 is a potent, reliable firearm for anyone.

    It’s not pretty. But pretty isn’t what saves your life.