The NRA Carry Guard, the National Rifle Association’s new concealed carry training and insurance program, was officially introduced back in April ahead of its annual meetings. Now, we’re seeing some interesting news regarding the training courses being offered.

The “Level One” program specifically prohibits the use of revolvers and 1911s as one’s “primary firearm,” The Firearm Blog reported. Here’s the actual quote from the NRA Carry Guard website:

*NOTE: NRA Carry Guard Level One is designed for training with a semi-automatic handgun (Glock 19/17, Sig P226/P228 or equivalent). We will not allow revolvers or 1911s as your primary firearm in this class.

The decision to ban revolvers and 1911s as a primary gun has raised eyebrows among some, given the popularity of those platforms for concealed carry. You are, however, allowed to use a 1911 or a revolver as a backup gun during the Level One class, the NRA says:

You should bring a secondary firearm that you carry concealed, as well as a holster for such. We will run the course with a primary carry weapon and then run a course of fire with a secondary or back-up gun to evaluate the differences. Please bring at least 40 rounds of ammo appropriate for your carry firearm for this portion of the class. Revolvers, 1911s and/or subcompacts can be used for this portion of the class.

A three-day class that costs $850 per person, the NRA Carry Guard Level One program covers everything from the fundamentals (stance, grip, holster draw, sight alignment, trigger press, recoil management, follow through) and live-fire progression drills to combat and tactical reloads; drawing from a holster; low light/no light shooting; treating malfunctions; safety awareness; reloading while holding a light; key concealed carry components; carry locations (waist, ankle, purse, etc.); and real world scenario training (airsoft scenarios).

Meanwhile, as the Truth About Guns points out, the United States Concealed Carry Association—which offers its own concealed carry and insurance program and was controversially disinvited from the NRA Annual Meetings—recently announced it would be teaming up with the Personal Defense Network (PDN) to offer more nationwide training opportunities to its members.

Below, check out videos hyping both the NRA Carry Guard and the USCCA and PDN partnership.

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